Ronal for Lorinser R91. Solid Work. [Mercedes W201, W124, R129]

Ronal, Lorinser.

It is not the most exciting duo.

IMG_20200119_105457

One could associate Ronal with boring OE Fares, while Lorinser’s tend to be the shiny and heavy stuff older gents put on their R107.

It is not groundbreaking.

But that’s not quite fair. If it wasn’t for Ronal, we would not have the sublime 3-piece wheels made for the sister companies Carlsson and Hartge.

Moreover, following through their collab with Lorinser came out the bold RSK3, with hidden bolts, producing a completely flat finish. Kept high polished the result was stunning, the perfect addition / complement for a tastefully mod’ed VIP LS.

  • Cipango horizon

But see, here’s the drift.

During the ever seminal 90’s, Lorinser, as Carlsson would later do, chose to go where the wind was blowing and started producing for Japanese cars, or at least in JDM application (the ubiquitous 5×114.3)

Going straight at 18s and 19s was bold.

IMG_20200119_112528

But before in the early 90’s they honed their skills on a nice 3 pieces in 17’’ and all round specs, the R91, in comfortable and familiar 5×112 “3 pointed star” PCD.

At the time Ronal had just bought Gotti Wheels (1986), the french manufacturer of multi-piece wheels. It might be inferred that this crucial knowledge was put into practice on the R91 (remember i am learning as i go, so please let me know in the comments if you have found a 3 piece Ronal Wheels prior to 1986).

I say all round, because its specs are dangerously close to the gorgeous Ceginus / EVO II Wheels, and, diameter aside, the EVO I Wheel.

8x  17 ET 35 is suitable for W124 (500E included), W201 (even the Evo 2 with the wider body) and the Roadster R129.

Rather convenient.

  • Design

IMG_20200119_112542

It is a balanced design, that is simple overall (5 massive spokes) and extra intricate on details as Germans often do.

The 8-point removal tool is a piece of art.

IMG_20200119_121827

Damn that hard plastic.

I can only imagine the numbers of hard plastic alloys that failed the stringent testing for wear and cracking over time.

And it worked: after more than 25 years the removal tool I used with this set is in very good condition with no sign of fading or more worryingly, cracking.

  • Stock PickingIMG_20200119_111951

OZ RACING / AMG

RONAL / LORINSER

Since 1929 only 4% of the stocks of the S&P 500 explain the over performance of the broader index.

It’s all about picking the winners.

Car collectors for obvious OE reasons (see Ferrari guy according to Matt Farah) have chosen their safe winner, as valuations for the classic OZ Aero AMG 17×8.5-10  have now skyrocketed.

But besides that, what really differentiates the two?

It’s a point I was trying to get across in this piece as well on my poster / problem child, Speedline.

Upon closer inspection, build quality is strikingly similar.

Clear coat lasts as much, bolts (don’t) rust as much, paint is just as durable.

It is once again a matter of correct labeling.

In a broader sense it was also a cross of trajectories.

In 1993, AMG was now playing with the big boys : its tuning and racing abilities had been recognized and more importantly had been made available in the Mercedes dealership network.

Things were looking up.

In those years Lorinser was going through a hangover: gone were the heady days of printing money for casting chunky* piece of alloys for a good looking luxury roadster ( The Lorinser RS for R107).

The 129 chassis had dramatically raised the bar.

OZ Racing them again was preparing a Coup de Trafalgar with its MAE* offering.

  • Conclusion

Ronal & Lorinser, you did what you had to do.

Produced in May 1993, only 2 years and half after the R129 debut, It’s a very well-built ensemble in a very attractive weight, only tipping the 10 kilos bar because of the bullet proof hubcaps.

It paved the way for the beautiful RSK “flat” on which I plan to write soon.

  1. Specs

R91 8017535

Weight : 10.3 kilo.

Wheels featured in this article are available here 

*8 x 16 ET 22 front ET 11 REAR each front wheel weighted 12 kilos, a rear more than 13 kilos.

*casual folk etymology of MAE : it means « front » in Japanese.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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